Health Information Technology

Telehealth is going mainstream. Once limited to rural or remote communities, the use of telehealth is increasingly being used to address critical shortages within many medical specialties (such as dermatology, neurology, radiology, critical care and mental health), and as a more efficient means to provide health care services. Many leading nationally-recognized health care providers, health

As the technologies used to deliver telehealth services become more complex, telehealth providers as well as other HIPAA “covered entities” have an increasingly demanding role to play in ensuring the security of protected health information (PHI).  To fulfill this role, both telehealth providers and their business associates (such as the information technology companies and data

Too often, companies try to re-invent the wheel.  This is especially true in the telehealth sector where new models of care are constantly being tried and tested.  Fortunately for U.S. hospitals, health systems, and companies, however, we have great examples of telehealth models from around the world that have built successful business models in telehealth.

On January 25, 2013, the Department of Health and Human Services (“HHS”) published in the Federal Register the highly anticipated Omnibus Rule, which strengthens and amends existing regulations in the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules. The rule will significantly affect health technology companies, including telehealth companies, data centers, and personal health record vendors, with an

The recent discovery of a security flaw that allows Skype accounts to essentially be hijacked has again raised the issue of the security of web-based platforms—and whether providers can meet their HIPAA obligations when using these communication tools.  The issue of Skype and similar platforms and HIPAA compliance is one that I am often asked

By Ross K. Friedberg and Ophir Stemmer

This year we’ve seen a continuation of the trend toward heightened regulation and enforcement of the privacy and security requirements under the Health Information Portability andAccountability Act (“HIPAA”) and under other state and federal health privacy laws. Although there have not been any significant changes to federal

With a new era of active enforcement of the HIPAA privacy and security laws upon us, companies need to figure out early-on whether they are regulated under HIPAA, either as covered entities or business associates.  However, determining whether a company is subject to the HIPAA privacy and security requirements is not always straightforward, especially

Katherine R. Lofftby Katherine R. Lofft

There are myriad opportunities right now for new businesses and talented entrepreneurs targeting healthcare, particularly in the IT sector.  It’s an exciting time for people and companies looking to harness the promise of innovation and the power of technology to improve health care delivery, empower patients and lower costs.

However, even

Mobile application (“app”) development is the new boon for technology companies of all sizes, and the phrase “There’s an app for that” tells the story of just how much this market has grown and matured.  Most of the early app development focused on low risk opportunities—those involving free or low-cost social media or gaming apps. 

Imagine there are two hospitals (or two physician groups). One is highly specialized and has developed a telemedicine program for treating stroke patients; the other is a community hospital or physician practice that would like to take part in this telemedicine program but does not want to pay for the technology needed to virtually connect