In March 2018, the Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission (MACPAC) made its 2018 report to Congress, which included the Commission’s evaluation of telehealth services provided through the Medicaid program. Chapter 2 of MACPAC’s report had a positive outlook on telehealth’s contribution toward better accessibility of health care services to underserved individuals as well

medicare1As many of you know, reimbursement for telehealth services is a mixed bag.  On the one hand, private payers generally seem ahead of the curve.  Many leading private insurers reimburse for telehealth.  Generally these coverage policies provide reimbursement for telehealth services when they involve the use of real-time interactive audio, video, or other electronic media

By:  Alaap Shah and Marshall Jackson

With the New Year, come new protections for health care entities and individuals utilizing electronic health records (EHRs).  On December 27, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), issued final rules regarding the

During and after a recent presentation regarding telehealth before a health care executive group, we were inundated with the following question:  Why should a hospital provide telehealth services when often times it will not get paid for those services?  It is, on its face, a great question.  After all, few of us would want to

As telehealth continues to grow, there are a number of legal, regulatory, and operational issues that threaten to stall its progress.  We have tackled many of these issues in previous blog posts.  But no obstacle looms larger than the issue of payment.  How can providers get consistently and appropriately reimbursed by payers for use

 A significant yet little-noticed trend is underway. And its effects could be far-reaching.  A growing number of states are enacting so-called telehealth parity statutes. These laws generally require health insurers to pay for services provided via telehealth the same way they would for services provided in-person. Almost a third of all states have enacted these