There can be no question that telehealth has gone mainstream.  The numbers speak volumes. Telehealth companies have been able to raise almost $500 million since 2007 according to a noted venture capital analyst.  A recent study indicated that U.S. employers could save up to $6 billion a year through telehealth.  Per the American Telemedicine Association,

By:  Alaap Shah and Marshall Jackson

With the New Year, come new protections for health care entities and individuals utilizing electronic health records (EHRs).  On December 27, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General (OIG) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), issued final rules regarding the

Telehealth is going mainstream. Once limited to rural or remote communities, the use of telehealth is increasingly being used to address critical shortages within many medical specialties (such as dermatology, neurology, radiology, critical care and mental health), and as a more efficient means to provide health care services. Many leading nationally-recognized health care providers, health

While tremendous strides continue to be made in the growth and adoption of telehealth services, significant legal obstacles remain.  Among these obstacles are state drug prescribing laws.  In many states, physicians cannot lawfully prescribe drugs during a telehealth encounter, except in very limited circumstances.  For example, California requires that physicians perform a “physical exam” before

Many legal obstacles have long stood in the way of telehealth. There are licensure laws, prescribing laws, practice of medicine requirements, credentialing rules, insurance coverage issues, and concerns about privacy, among others.  These hurdles have until recently relegated telehealth to the most geographically remote corners of health care where the only means of obtaining medical