We are all too familiar with the many hurdles that stand in the way of the greater proliferation of telehealth.  This blog has examined various legal and regulatory stumbling blocks such as licensure, reimbursement, and privacy that continue to stand in the way of telehealth fulfilling its great promise—at least in the United

As telehealth continues to grow, there are a number of legal, regulatory, and operational issues that threaten to stall its progress.  We have tackled many of these issues in previous blog posts.  But no obstacle looms larger than the issue of payment.  How can providers get consistently and appropriately reimbursed by payers for use

The following may surprise some: FDA approval or clearance is never enough. Not if manufacturers want a commercially successful product. There is no doubt that addressing FDA issues is critical. But without data to show effectiveness, payers will not reimburse a particular product or technology—and even the most promising product will languish in the market

In the past few months, we’ve seen a number of federal agencies take important steps to promote telemedicine. In May, the Department of Agriculture began a $15 million grant and loan program that will provide funding to innovative rural telemedicine programs; the Veteran’s Administration, building on its already impressive telemedicine capabilities, reported in July that

 A significant yet little-noticed trend is underway. And its effects could be far-reaching.  A growing number of states are enacting so-called telehealth parity statutes. These laws generally require health insurers to pay for services provided via telehealth the same way they would for services provided in-person. Almost a third of all states have enacted these