As we have explored a number of times on this blog, telemedicine has gone mainstream.  The more recent development is that employers seem to be paying more attention now. The numbers speak for themselves. A recent Towers Watson study focusing on employers with at least 1,000 employees concluded that U.S. employers could save up

As telehealth grows and becomes more mainstream, all kinds of questions often arise.  They range from administrative to operational to legal issues. In conjunction with the American Hospital Association, my colleague Amy Lerman and I have co-written two white papers for the American Hospital Association Trendwatch series focusing on telehealth issues. Among other things,

Earlier this week, the American Telemedicine Association reported an important clarification regarding the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (“CMS’s”) plans for expanding reimbursement for telehealth services provided to Medicare beneficiaries.  The October 31, 2014 final rule with comment period regarding payments to physicians generated much excitement in the telehealth community, particularly

There can be no question that telehealth has gone mainstream.  The numbers speak volumes. Telehealth companies have been able to raise almost $500 million since 2007 according to a noted venture capital analyst.  A recent study indicated that U.S. employers could save up to $6 billion a year through telehealth.  Per the American Telemedicine Association,

A significant barrier to the interstate practice of telehealth is closer to being broken down. The Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) has completed and distributed a draft Interstate Medical Licensure Compact, designed to facilitate physician licensure portability that should enhance the practice of interstate telehealth.  Essentially, the compact would create an additional licensing pathway,

By:  Alaap Shah and Ali Lakhani

The Good: 

“Hey Doc, just shoot me a text . . .”

The business case supporting text messaging in a health care environment is compelling – it is mobile, fast, direct, and increases dialogue between physicians and patients as well as streamlines the often inefficient page/callback paradigm that